Archive for the ‘Tea Ceremony’ Category

Bridal Tea Gallery 2 Preview

Wednesday, December 9th, 2009

Just added another gallery from one of the photographers during the bridal tea ceremony.

well wishes from famil members during the tea offering

That’s my auntie wishing us well after we offered tea. (It was more like lukewarm water because we completely forgot about making tea while getting ready. There aren’t rules about that, are there?)

Bust A Move

Tuesday, December 8th, 2009

Finally got a minute today to post the first bridal tea gallery from one of the photographers during the bridal tea ceremony.

husband dancing during the Chinese door game

Moves like that don’t happen everyday… only during the endearing wedding festivity: The Door Game.

Tea Ceremony at Bride’s Home

Sunday, December 6th, 2009

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Pro Pics: Groom’s Tea Ceremony 2

Tuesday, November 17th, 2009

Pictures taken by Mitch Ranger. Please be patient for them to load!

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Pro Pics: Groom’s Tea Ceremony 1

Monday, November 16th, 2009

Pictures taken by Mitch Ranger. Please be patient for them to load!

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Details of the Ceremony

Monday, November 2nd, 2009

All the closeup details from our ceremonies.

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The Groom Tea Ceremony

Tuesday, September 8th, 2009

Powered up from the nap on the limo bus, it was time to get the ceremony going again. We arrived at the groom’s house and started the procession to be accepted by his ancestors.

These photos were taken by Mitch Ranger.

We pulled up to his family’s home to be greeted by the guests.

Groom's home

The groom’s house has a sign that says, "tan hon" which is Vietnamese for essentially "Just married" since we were spiritually married at the bride’s home.

Vietnamese sign at Groom's residence

We got off the bus in procession as the guys hold onto the remainder of the dowry. Firecrackers go off again to let everyone know that we’re there.

Firecrackers

Bridal Party procession

Bridal Party procession

After the bridal party and the newlyweds’ parents enter the home, the family and then the guests follow suit.

Guests enter after the bride and groom

Inside the home, the representative welcomes the guests and explain the proceedings in front of the groom’s ancestors’ altars.

Everyone gathered inside the groom's home

His parents also welcomed the guests. First, his father spoke, then his mother.

Everyone gathered inside the groom's home

There was a break in the formality when his mother said thank you to the guests for coming to the marriage of "Donny and Kevin". She was so used to saying it that it rolled off her tongue. Everyone found some humor in it as he hugged his brother.

His mom cracking up because she said he was marrying his brother

I had to laugh too

Hugging his new wife

Candles were lit and I was introduced to each ancestor.

Lighting Altar candles

Introduction the the Altar

Then, tea was given to his relatives and they then gave us lucky gifts and advice.

Offering tea

Offering tea

Offering tea

Offering tea

Once all the tea was offered, we asked the judge to step forward and marry us legally.

Traveling

Saturday, September 5th, 2009

These pictures were collected from the bridal party. The tea ceremonies were two cities apart, 1.5 hours driving, to be exact. We had a party bus take us and the bridal party from the tea ceremony in Madison Heights to the final one in Lansing.

We’re about to get onto the bus

Getting on the bus

The ushers loaded the pig onto the bus.

The pig!

We were all still wide awake when we first got on the bus. Moscato d’ Asti was passed around to celebrate – in classy styrofoam cups no less!

Woo! Moscato!

Cheers!

Here we are, the happy couple

Happy couple

Maid of honor and bridesmaid (Karen & Megan)

Maid of Honor and a Bridesmaid

Our siblings

Kids

One of our ushers and his wife, a bridesmaid (Ryan & Sara)

More bridal party members

And then Donny started us all off to nap time

ZZzzzZZZzzz

Dropping like flies

So tired

So tired

I joined in too

Sleepy bride

Then we had to stop for a pee break. When I woke up, it was hot, so I took off my jacket. Ow OW!

The bus got hot

Ok! Yay, we got to the groom’s house, finally!

Tea Ceremony Details

Friday, September 4th, 2009

These photos were taken by Mitch Ranger. As you can see, the main colors in the morning were red and gold for traditional luck. The Vietnamese attire, called Ao Dai, added the punches of color.

A nice little collage of the ceremony

Wedding Tea Ceremony Collage

Signs in front of the bride and groom’s homes, respectively.

Bride's Home Sign

Groom's Home Sign

My ceremony dress and the bouquet his mother made for me.

Wedding Tea Ceremony Detail: Bride

We wore the ornate Vietnamese Ao Dai in the morning.

Wedding Tea Ceremony Detail: Ao Dai

Traditional wedding dowries include the Betel Fruit

Wedding Tea Ceremony Detail: Betel Fruit

Everything is wrapped in red cellophane and covered in red cloth since red is LUCKY!

Wedding Tea Ceremony Detail: Lucky Red Items

Wedding Tea Ceremony Detail: Lucky Red Items

Jewely offering for the dowry

Wedding Tea Ceremony Detail: Jewelry

Wedding Tea Ceremony Detail: Jewelry

Other fruits to share between the families

Wedding Tea Ceremony Detail:Fresh Fruit

Chinese pastries

Wedding Tea Ceremony Detail: Pastries

Tea to offer to the family

Wedding Tea Ceremony Detail: Tea

Décor straight from Vietnam.

Wedding Tea Ceremony Detail: Colorful lanterns

One of the Buddhist figures on the altars at my mother’s home.

Wedding Tea Ceremony Detail: Buddhist figures

One of the altars at his parent’s home.

Wedding Tea Ceremony Detail: Altars

A roast pig is always part of the Vietnamese dowry.

Wedding Tea Ceremony Detail: Roast pig

The Bride Tea Ceremony

Monday, August 31st, 2009

After he succesfully made it through the door game, the guys and his family piled into the house where the tea ceremony commenced. At the bride’s house, the groom’s family asks the bride’s family for permission to marry her to their son. (Full explaination of the ceremony here.)

These photos were taken by Mitch Ranger.

In a Vietnamese ceremony, the bride’s house has a sign at the front door saying "Du Quy" which essentially means "home of the bride".

Vietnamese Sign for Home of the Bride

Our ushers carried in the roast pig, a traditional dowry item.

The pig

In Asian culture, the mother of the bride is the one who takes her to her groom. My mother walked me down the stairs.

Then, my grandpa (the Bride’s representative), introduces the bride to the guests.

My family representative

Me

The guests

The guests

His parents tell my mother that they will love me as their own and wish to include me as one of their family members. At times, this was pretty emotional.

Groom's parent's asking for permission

Groom's parent's asking for permission

My mother was the tearjerker for sure, though. She said some private words and then granted him her blessing to marry me. They hugged, then I hugged =).

Groom's parent's asking for permission

Groom's parent's asking for permission

Caught little moment.

Sharing a moment

The representatives of each family light a candle and place it on the alter.

Lighting the candle

Jewelry, which is a significant part of the dowry, is then placed on the bride.

Placing a necklace on the Bride

Earrings are of the most significance to a Chinese bride. The groom’s mom offers the jewelry to the bride’s mom. In our family tradition, the bride’s mom then offers the groom’s mom to help her put on the earrings. (If it looks painful, it was. They were the screw-on type and they both had claws.)

Placing earrings on the Bride

Then it was our turn to light incense to my ancestors.

Lighting incense to honor my ancestors

After being accepted by the ancestors, we offered my family tea. Each family member accepted the tea and then offered us either advice or good luck wishes. The oldest couple goes first, then parents, then other immediate relatives.

Offering tea to my great aunt

If the room was dry, my mother changed that. She gave him an origami $2 heart, signifying that we were now two people with one life. In the middle of the heart was a dollar coin that my late grandmother had dipped in gold for her granddaughters’ husbands to hold safe.

Offering tea to my mom

Mom giving him the heart

More tea offerings

Offering tea to my uncle and his family[*]
Offering tea to my uncle and his family

Offering tea to my aunt

After we offered the tea, he got a dose of what it takes to be a woman. He tripped all over his traditional Ao Dai.

Ao Dais are tricky

Afterwards, the pig was cut in half to feed the guests. It is traditional to consum half of the offerings at the bride’s house and take the rest back to the groom’s house.

Cutting the pig

Guests eating

Around 11AM, everyone gathered outside to travel to the groom’s tea ceremony.

Off to Lansing

Here we go!