Posts Tagged ‘invitations’

DIY | Rehearsal Invitations

Friday, May 29th, 2009

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Tools:

  • Paint Shop Pro or Photoshop (or whatever else you want to use)
  • Lavender metallic cardstock paper from paperandmore.com
  • Fiskars rotary cutter with straight blade
  • Corner punch

I created it using Paint Shop Pro. I use Photoshop too, but I prefer PSP. I used the same dragon/phoenix tail vector that I designed for the website and invitation enclosures.

This is the rough draft (a little blurry here due to the high resolution being shrunk to website size):

Wedding Rehearsal Invitation Mockup

diy wedding rehearsal invitation

I printed these myself on the cardstock.

diy wedding rehearsal invitation

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Invitations Are DONE!

Tuesday, April 21st, 2009

Finally. I only started the whole process in… JANUARY. See them here!

Finished invitation

The only thing I have left to do is to finish the announcements that are heading to Vietnam. They won’t have the scroll for easier postage. We’re heading to the post office today to send them on their way. I don’t think it will be complete in one trip though since they’ll be stamped boxed by box.

I made Karen the guinea pig and sent hers out last week. She received it yesterday and gushed! I’m excited. His mom also received all of the hand delivered invitations so a handful of people have received theirs too. She excitedly told me that everyone thought they were great. If you don’t like them, don’t tell me, lol.

Next: panels. I am REALLY looking forward to non-paper crafts. I can’t wait to pick up my paint brush!

DIY | Wrap-around Labels

Sunday, April 12th, 2009

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Tools:

I made the labels in Microsoft Word by using the vertical template. I added the graphics by pasting them onto the background and adjusted the row heights so that the guests’ names would all fit.

Each specific label looked like this.

DIY wrap around Address Labels for wedding invitations

The document ended up looking like this.

DIY wrap around Address Labels for wedding invitations

After printing them, I used my rotary cutter to cut them to size and stuck them on my boxes. You can use them for envelopes to with a side format. Just change the text direction or download the horizontal template.

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DIY | Scroll Design

Friday, April 3rd, 2009

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Scroll Design

I had some of the girls over to help replace the wine-colored tassels with pretty silver organza bows on all of the scrolls. They did a great job and we finished in no time! I’d probably still be tying bows if it weren’t for them.

Putting together the wedding invitation scrolls

Putting together the wedding invitation scrolls

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DIY | Invitations

Wednesday, April 1st, 2009

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diy scroll wedding invitations

diy wedding invitation enclosure cards

They’re finally done. I made the pocketfolds and enclosures. The girls helped me re-tie scrolls and I ordered bulk tissue paper from nashvillewraps.com.

The only part of the invitations that we did not make were the scrolls and the shipping boxes. I ordered the scrolls from Indian Wedding Card. They had all kinds of super-ornate designs, so I customized a plain lavender scroll with chocolate text. They didn’t have any "tassels" that matched our theme, so I just ordered silver ones to be replaced with silver organza ribbon. I designed the header image to include the dragon, phoenix, and double happiness motif.

diy scroll wedding invitations

diy scroll wedding invitations

I had some of the girls over to help replace the wine-colored tassels with pretty silver organza bows on all of the scrolls. They did a great job and we finished in no time! I’d probably still be tying bows if it weren’t for them.

diy scroll wedding invitations

diy scroll wedding invitations

From other DIY projects, the enclosures were organized and brought together. Donny put together the RSVP envelopes.

diy scroll wedding invitations

I stuffed everything into the pocketfolds that I laboriously made.

diy wedding invitation pocketfolds

diy wedding invitation pocketfolds

…while he folded boxes. I bought these boxes from Ebay user megaboxwarehouse. I recommend them. They were cost effective and fast.

diy wedding invitation boxes

It took a LONG time for me to finish stuffing and organizing. After stuffing, each invitation was tied with lavender ribbon. We did a criss cross pattern so that the bow on the scroll would be a focal point, as if to say, "OPEN ME, DAMNIT!" (You see this in the final pictures way below.) This is the back of the pocketfold with the little bow securing the x-pattern.

diy wedding invitations

I printed shipping labels with the tail design on Staples sticker sheets and he stuffed tissue into the boxes. Divide and conquer!

diy wedding invitations

Finally, I took our 220 invitations into assembly-line mode. Open, fix the tissue that he did not properly place into the box, insert filled pocketfold, insert scroll, close box, stick printed and cut label onto box, repeat.

diy wedding invitations

diy wedding invitations

diy wedding invitations

diy wedding invitations

diy wedding invitations

diy wedding invitations

I organized them into groups and continued.

diy wedding invitations

…and here they are ALLLLLLLLLL DONE and ready to be sent.

diy wedding invitations

diy wedding invitations

Postage was not as bad as we thought it would be. The man working when we sent these puppies out definitely hated us, or life, whichever. After an hour of printing and sticking each stamp onto the boxes, he handed us an itemized receipt.

Itemized receipt

Itemized receipt

It was 15 feet and 10 inches. The international boxes were on a different receipt that definitely pushed our length past 16 feet.

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DIY | Enclosure Card

Sunday, March 29th, 2009

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Making the DIY Wedding Invitation Enclosures

After searching and searching for cute lavender and chocolate invitations, I was unimpressed. I liked having information organized on different cards, so naturally, pocketfold enclosures stood out to me. We decided we’d have these as invitations almost as soon as we were engaged. However, still unimpressed by the designs and colors, I decided it would be more cost-effective and original to design and make them myself.

Tools:

  • Paint Shop Pro or Adobe Photoshop
  • Microsoft Word
  • Metallic lavender paper from paperandmore.com
  • Top-loading printer (Epson is AWESOME)
  • Paper cutter (I used a Fiskers large paper cutter with rotary blades)
  • Straight rotary blade
  • Perforation rotary blade
  • Corner punch
  • Spray fixative or cheap hairspray

The graphics we chose to sew through the ceremonies and reception were the traditional symbols of the dragon and phoenix. I designed a modern vector motif of their tails on Paint Shop Pro (seen at the top of this website) and chose to have it running up the side of the enclosure cards without break, meaning, the same image would flow throughout the cards. We also had two different versions of invitations to send out: reception only and ceremony+reception so I had to be careful coordinating. It took patience to paste and align the graphic such that it "flowed" to the next card, but when it FINALLY worked, it looked awesome… at least to us.

Here is the plan in Word. I created a table template to the size of each card and aligned the graphics.

diy invitation enclosure for directions diy invitation enclosure for accomodations diy invitation enclosure for reception and RSVP plan in Word

I printed EVERYTHING on a top loading Epson printer. The printer was GREAT with cardstock. DO NOT use a bottom feed printer – they tend to jam, ultimately leading to profanity and a stiff drink. I tested on simple white paper first. The graphic lined up perfectly!!! After each page is printed, I recommend spray a fixative that you can purchase at a craft store or cheap hairspray on any inkjet printed items, otherwise the ink will bleed if it gets wet post-printing. I used to spray hairspray on all of my charcoal artwork to prevent smearing or smudging.

Making the DIY Wedding Invitation Enclosures

I ordered extra cardstock (which was a fantastic idea since I started running out of ink or some would come out smudgey) and tested printing. Then, off we go!

Making the DIY Wedding Invitation Enclosures

Making the DIY Wedding Invitation Enclosures

After printing all of the enclosures, I used the Fiskars rotary cutter and did more work. After cutting all of them, I had to punch out all of the corners. It was tiresome. Cardstock is very difficult to punch so I placed a cutting board on the floor with a dampening magazine, a coaster, and used my entire body weight for each corner. I definitely had to make up reasons for breaks. This was my messy work area:

Making the DIY Wedding Invitation Enclosures

Here are each of the cards I made:

Making the DIY Wedding Invitation Enclosures
RSVP Card

Making the DIY Wedding Invitation Enclosures
Reception Card

Making the DIY Wedding Invitation Enclosures
Accommodations Card w/ VIP Parking Pass

Making the DIY Wedding Invitation Enclosures
Directions Card

Making the DIY Wedding Invitation Enclosures
Back of Directions Card

FINALLY! It took a couple weeks on and off to finish these. The most time consuming part was waiting for the ink to dry properly. The painful part was corner-punching.

Making the DIY Wedding Invitation Enclosures

This is how it looks inside the pocketfold.

Making the DIY Wedding Invitation Enclosures


Tips

Now that I’ve printed way too many enclosures to count, I do have some tips.

  • Do: Order extra materials. You never know when you add more guests or mess up so the best thing I did for myself was order extra. I added 10% additional materials to any order I made.
  • Do: Make several mock-ups of your enclosure design to ensure they fit in the envelope or pocket fold.
  • Do: Understand that it is very time consuming before you jump into this. You WILL become sick of doing the same task over and over again.
  • Do: Take breaks!
  • Do: Use a top loading printer. Anything that bends or wraps your paper will be a pain.
  • Do: Use a spray fixative or hair spray on th paper after printing, if you’re printing with an ink jet. The ink will run if it comes in contact with water.
  • Don’t: Hasten the process. You’ll get sloppy. Allow time for the things to dry, etc.
  • Don’t: Think that this can be done in a day.

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DIY | Pocketfolds

Saturday, March 28th, 2009

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It took 2,392 Fiskars cuts and 360 corner punches to finish these puppies, but I love how they turned out.

Tools:

  • Microsoft Excel template (This template has been downloaded times.)
    • The template is a compressed .zip file. Click here for instructions to extract.
  • Chocolate cardstock paper from papersource.com
  • Pencil
  • Ruler or straight-edge
  • Scissors
  • Rubber cement
  • Bone folder
  • Corner punch

I loved pocket envelopes since I first started looking at invitations back in 2007. They’re so neat and clean, but they were so pricey. We were already having scrolls made, so I did not want to add anymore cost to the invitations. I also didn’t love 100% of the pocketfolds I found. They all have some angled dip in the pocket and no offense if you like it, but it wasn’t my style.

Again, in an effort to save some moolah and have something I DO love 100%, I made all of the pocketfold envelopes. I used Microsoft Excel to create a grid template to figure out how much space and paper I would need (crazy, I know). I make mockups with white paper and ended up calculating that I could make four envelopes from one 20" by 26" piece of paper from paper-source.com.

Here is the plan in Excel. You can download the plan here. It is best viewed at 30% Zoom.

Making the diy enclosure envelopes

Making the diy enclosure envelopes

I got my huge stack of paper within a couple days.

Making the diy enclosure envelopes

I penciled ALL of the lines with light pressure and a straight-edge. The paper was too big to fit in my paper-cutter, so I and cut them with scissors. THAT was the biggest pain.

Making the diy enclosure envelopes

Making the diy enclosure envelopes

I scored all of the fold lines with a bone folder and creased them. I used rubber cement to secure the pockets. (See below for how to use rubber cement so that your paper WILL NOT come apart. I had previously used Tombo permanent glue tape and some of the pocketfolds came apart while I was stuffing them.)

Making the diy enclosure envelopes

Making the diy enclosure envelopes

Making the diy enclosure envelopes

Finally, he helped me by punching all of the corners for a clean look.

Making the diy enclosure envelopes

Voila!

Making the diy enclosure envelopes

Cost

Order A7 pocketfolds: $0.80 per invite (on average)
DIY custom pocketfolds: $0.41 per invite (inc. shipping)

Ordering plain, solid color A7 pockefolds from places like cardsandpockets.com or paperandmore will cost you about 95% MORE than it would cost you to spend the time making them. Because I made four envelopes on one larger sheet of paper, each one cost me $0.41 to make (this includes the cost of shipping the materials. It is $0.34 per invite if you have shipping costs in your budget elsewhere.)


Tips

Now that I’ve made 206 invitations plus 22 announcements, I do have some tips.

  • Do: Order extra materials. You never know when you add more guests or mess up so the best thing I did for myself was order extra. I added 10% additional materials to any order I made.
  • Do: Make several mock-ups of your pocketfold design to ensure your enclosures all fit. Cardstock is thicker, so be aware of the pocket size. Layering the cardstock necessitates a little bit more width in the pocket. My enclosures were 5 inches wide, so the pocketfolds were designed to be 5 1/8 inches wide.
  • Do: Understand that it is very time consuming before you jump into this. You WILL become sick of doing the same task over and over again.
  • Do: Take breaks!
  • Do: Use rubber cement. This is an old art school trick. Brush rubber cement to both surfaces and allow them to dry a little. Then, adhere the surfaces together. Rub off any excess glue with your fingers. That is my favorite part about rubber cement… you can’t see the glue after it is all said and done. You will also have a hard time taking the two paper surfaces apart with this method.
  • Do: Find yourself an ergonomic corner punch. My punch was NOT friendly. It enduced carpal tunnel problems. I ended up placing the punch on a flat surface and using one of my rubber/steel coasters to press the button to avoid the hand cramps.
  • Don’t: Order TOO thick of cardstock. You’re folding and gluing so it gets to be rather tricky if you’re using 150# cover material. My pocketfolds were 80# cover weight.
  • Don’t: Hasten the process. You’ll get sloppy. Allow time for the glue to dry, etc.
  • Don’t: Deny help. I’m a perfectionist and it was difficult for me to relinquish having control over every single pocketfold, but when he started helping me punch corners and cut, it went by faster… AND we got to spend time together.
  • Don’t: Think that this can be done in a day.

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DIY | Total Invitation

Friday, March 27th, 2009

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Finished DIY invitation; lavender, scroll, chocolate

Click on the links to see how each item was made.

First, I made the pocketfolds.

Finished DIY invitation; lavender, scroll, chocolate

Then, I made the enclosures.

Finished DIY invitation; lavender, scroll, chocolate

I bought scrolls with my custom logo design.

Finished DIY invitation; lavender, scroll, chocolate

I put all of it together in a box with some tissue underneath.

Finished DIY invitation; lavender, scroll, chocolate

I made wrap-around labels.

Finished DIY invitation; lavender, scroll, chocolate

Then, we shipped it.

Finished DIY invitation; lavender, scroll, chocolate

Woohoo!

Cost

I’ve had inquiries on how much these invitations cost to make. Here’s the breakdown.


Invitation Item Source Cost per invite (inc. shipping)
Scroll indianweddingcard.com $3.02
Pocketfolds paper-source.com $0.41
Boxes ebay.com $0.42
Enclosure paper paperandmore.com $0.48
Tissue nashvillewraps.com (est. since tissue was used in favors too) $0.01
Ink Staples (estimation since ink was used to print other items) $0.53
Ribbon Michael’s (estimation since ribbon was used on other items) $0.11
Stamps (RSVP plus mailing) $2.44

Total
$7.41
Total (less shipping)
$4.89

The scrolls were the priciest part because of the shipping from India. Without shipping costs and international fees, the scrolls cost would have been $2.01 per invitation, totaling the cost of making the whole invitation to be $3.87 (not including shipping). Pocketfolds were also only $0.34 each if you don’t include paying for shipping, etc. Our shipping costs were in a different part of the "budget", but I added them here so you can see the TOTAL cost.

In the event you’re making pocketfolds, though, see how much you can save! Ordering plain, solid color A7 pockefolds from places like cardsandpockets.com or paperandmore will cost you about 95% MORE than it would cost you to spend the time making them. They are are labor of love though.

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Envelopes

Thursday, February 26th, 2009

When you start adding the costs of everything up, the cents start turning into dollars. The next thing you know, we want to add other “stuff” and we have to cut back SOMEWHERE.

Well, I decided to make enclosure envelopes. It’s not a difficult task. It’s just tedious. After a week of measuring, cutting, scoring, and folding, I am ALMOST done. I just need to do some gluing. It’s one of those details that no one will ever really recognize the effort poured into it, but it was worth it to save some time money and have invitations that will look exactly as we had envisioned. Ok, maybe that I envisioned. Donny isn’t one to envision envelopes. He DID help me though!

To prevent ruining a surprise in your mailbox, the documentary photos that I have taken will not be put online until after they are sent.

The most obnoxious task is coming up soon, however. I purchased cardstock to print our custom enclosure cards and they will not go through our bottom-fed HP printers. Not one out of two. We’re going to borrow someone else’s, but I will just let all brides know that if you think you’ll be able to load your 100# plus cardstock through a bottome feeder printer CONSISTANTLY, you are out of your mind. My samples printed earlier… the paper tricked me. I a smarter though and I WILL win.

DIY | Save The Date VIP Passes

Thursday, December 4th, 2008

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Tools:

  • Paint Shop Pro or Photoshop (or whatever else you want to use)
  • Vistaprint.com to print magnets
  • DIY card kit from Staples
  • Save the Date Card Template in Microsoft Word (This template has been downloaded times.)
  • Printer
  • Rectangular hole punch
  • Lanyards from Staples

It was very easy for us to come up with a theme. We are both city people and love to dance and meet people. Naturally, we went with an ongoing theme throughout our relationship: VIP party. These weren’t meant to be elaborate or end up on any bride’s MUST-DO list; rather, it was just our way of introducing our wedding with our personalities.

Since the theme was a little more personal among our friends, we just sent it to our friends. (Plus, the guest lists from either rents was not ready by the time these had to go out 6 months before the day.)

What goes with a VIP party theme? Well, a VIP pass does, of course! I bought cardstock and took one of our engagement photos of us goofing off in the middle of the city to plaster on its front. The printing at home took FOR-EV-ER. This is the template I made for the card.

diy VIP save the dates for our friends

Then I created a very simple and clean magnet design using Paint Shop Pro. I made it portrait orientation, then rotated it 90 degrees to make it landscape. This is important for vistaprint, or else, the image will be stretched. The file was saved as a .jpg. image. If you don’t have fancy schmancy software, you can create it in Word, take a screenshot of it and paste it into Paint or another similar basic image creator.

I logged onto Vistaprint.com. I really wanted it to be graphic like a VIP flyer, not necessarily "pretty". I uploaded it for a magnetic business card option.

Then, I chose to "Upload Your Own Design". I found the image I created. The rest is up to how many you need to order, etc.

diy VIP save the dates for our friends

Here are my magnets once they arrived!

diy VIP save the dates for our friends

I purchased lanyards from Staples and a rectangular hole puch from JoAnn’s (they always have 40% off sales).

diy VIP save the dates for our friends

diy VIP save the dates for our friends

So basically, you opened it to see me and Donny in a very strange picture. "Hmmm, what is this about?", one might ask. Then one would open it, remove the VIP lanyard, and read:

Click to enlarge

REASONS TO SAVE THE DATE
1) Donny and Thao are getting hitched after a 1.833 year engagement… it’s about time.
2) You are Very Important to them.
3) Do you really want to miss the "Shopping Cart" of "Sprinkler" in form?
Do what the VIP pass tells you.
SAVE THE DATE
06.27.09
Lansing, Michigan

And then the picture on the front makes sense. Hopefully. Ok, maybe not, but SOMEONE must’ve gotten it. Well, 3 stamps on many envelopes later, they were on their way out approximately 6 months before the big day!

diy VIP save the dates for our friends

I saw some people put their magnets on their refrigerators with the lanyards attached–made me giggle, but it was definitely refreshing to see the hard work displayed! The responses have also been great. Our friends said, "It is so you guys!" That’s all I can ask for =).

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